Keynote Talks

Evangelos Kranakis

Affiliation: Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada

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Title

Optimization Problems in Infrastructure Security

Abstract

How do we identify and prioritize risks and make smart choices based on fiscal constraints and limited resources? The main goal of infrastructure security is to secure, withstand, and rapidly recover from potential threats that may affect critical resources located within a given bounded region. In order to strengthen and maintain secure, functioning, and resilient critical infrastructure, proactive and coordinated efforts are necessary.

Motivated from questions raised by infrastructure security, in this talk we survey several recent optimization problems whose solution has occupied (and continues to occupy) computer science researchers in the last few years. Topics discussed include: (1) Patrolling, (2) Sensor Coverage and Interference, (3) Evacuation, (4) Domain Protection and Blocking.

The central theme in all the problems mentioned above will involve mobility in that the participating agents will be able to move over a specified region with a given speed.

Security in itself is undoubtedly a very broad and complex task which involves all layers of the communication process from physical to network. As such the limited goal of this survey is to outline existing models and ideas and discuss related open problems and future research directions, pertaining to optimization problems in infrastructure security.


Short Biography

Evangelos Kranakis is Chancellor's Professor at the Computer Science Department of Carleton University. He received a B.Sc. (in Mathematics) from the University of Athens, Greece, in 1973 and a Ph.D. (in Mathematical Logic) from the University of Minnesota, USA, in 1980. From 1980 to 1982, he was at the Mathematics Department of Purdue University, USA, from 1982 to 1983 at the mathematisches institut of the University of Heidelberg, Germany, from 1983 to 1985 at the Computer Science Department of Yale University, USA, from August to December of 1985 at the Computer Science Department of the Universiteit van Amsterdam, and from 1986 to 1991 at the Centrum voor Wiskunde en Informatica (CWI) in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. He joined the faculty of the School of Computer Science of Carleton University in the Fall of 1991.

More information available at: http://people.scs.carleton.ca/~kranakis




David Pointcheval

Affiliation: Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France

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Title

Secure Distributed Computation on Private Inputs

Abstract

Many companies have already started the migration to the Cloud and many individuals share their personal informations on social networks. While some of the data are public information, many of them are personal and even quite sensitive (strategic, medical, financial, intellectual property, etc). Unfortunately, the current access mode is purely right-based, therefore, the provider itself not only has total access to the data, but also knows which data are accessed, by whom, and how. Privacy, which includes secrecy of data (confidentiality), identities (anonymity), and requests (obliviousness), should be enforced by design.

Recent cryptographic primitives have been proposed, with functional encryption and fully homomorphic encryption. In this talk, we will propose some efficient concrete solutions, together with a new approach with secure multi-party computation.


Short Biography

David Pointcheval obtained his PhD in Computer Science from the University of Caen in 1996. Since 1998, he has been a CNRS researcher, in the Computer Science Department at Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France, in the Cryptography Team, that he leads since 2005. His research focuses on provable security of cryptographic primitives and protocols. He is an author of more than 100 international conference and journal papers, and an inventor of eleven patents. He has been program chair for several international conferences in cryptography, including PKC 2010 and Eurocrypt 2012. He has recently been awarded an ERC Advanced Grant on the Privacy for the Cloud.

More information available at: http://www.di.ens.fr/~pointche/